Library Management Institute Summer Conference 2011

Jul. 11, - Jul. 12, 2011
Location: Arcadia University, in Glenside, Pennsylvania Glenside, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania

LMI

 

The Library Management Institute

presents

“Managing the Future of Librarianship”

a two-day conference on the issues of library management and administration

Monday July 11th and Tuesday July 12th, 2011

 

Description of the Conference:This conference will be devoted exclusively to the current issues in library management and administration and will feature three keynote addresses and over 25 workshops presented by nationally-recognized library managers.

 

Who Should Attend: This conference is open to anyone directly involved in or having interest in library management. Library administrators, program managers, training specialists, human resources managers, public relations/marketing directors, fundraisers, and financial managers will enjoy the sessions of this conference.

 

Conference Location:The conference will take place on the campus of Arcadia University, in Glenside, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. Arcadia University is close to the Pennsylvania Turnpike and about 30 minutes from center city Philadelphia. (Directions to Arcadia).

 

Lodging:The official hotel for the conference is the Best Western Fort Washington Hotel in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania, about 10 minutes from the Arcadia campus. To make a reservation, contact Judy Braun at 215-542-7930 (ext. 286). The price of a single room (king size bed) is $85.00 per night + taxes. LMI will provide free shuttle service to and from the Arcadia campus.

 

The shuttle will also stop at the Hilton Garden Inn (Fort Washington) 215-646-4637  

                       

Cost:  Early Registration:      $159.00 per person

            Regular Registration:  $189.00 per person

 

            (see registration form for details on deadlines)

 

Your conference fee covers admission to all sessions, continental breakfast both days as well as morning and afternoon breaks, as well as the keynote lunch on Monday, the lunch on Tuesday and dinner on Monday evening.

 

The Library Management Institute

The Library Management Institute offers workshops and conferences for the library community with a special focus on the issues in library management and leadership. Topics include marketing and outreach, library human resources management, organizational dynamics, budgeting and financial management, and user dynamics.

 

 

 

The Conference

 

Monday July 11, 2011

 

8:30 am to 9:30 am

Registration & continental breakfast

 

9:30 am to 10:15 am

Keynote Address: Michael Crumpton

Michael Crumpton is the Assistant Dean for Administrative Services for the University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and holds an MLS from the University of Kentucky.  He is also a certified Senior Human Resource Professional and has earned a teaching certificate from North Carolina State University.  Following a 22 year retail management career, Michael first worked as Access Services Manager at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County before becoming Director at the Wake Technical Community College Library System. Much of his responsibility is on space planning, assessment and organizational development while his focus is on connecting with customers and users in order to provide the best service experience possible.

 

10:15 to 10:30 am

Morning Break

 

The Workshops

Two tracks will be offered throughout the two days: one in public library management and the other in academic & special library management. In each workshop session, there will be workshops from each track offered. Where a workshop is applicable to both audiences, it has been noted. You may attend any workshop you wish. We have used the following designations to help you plan your attendance at the workshops.

 

PLM (Public Library Management)

ASLM (Academic & Special Library Management)

 

 

 

 

 

Monday July 11, 2011

 

10:30 am to 11:45 am                         

Concurrent Workshops   

       

Room A

PLM

Tomorrow’s Manager – Succession Planning for Public Libraries

Mary E. Bennett-Brown,  Human Resources Director

The Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

 

Cathy Wilkymacky,Library Services Manager for the West Region

The Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

 

As the workforce shrinks across the library, we have to work harder to retain skilled people and become more creative in recruiting talent.  It is even more important that we recognize and reward peak performance while providing clear career paths for staff.  Succession planning is the process of identifying high-potential staff members, evaluating and honing their skills and abilities, and preparing them for advancement into positions which are key to the success of Library operations and objectives.  One of the major challenges of succession planning in libraries is “bench strength”-- the importance of providing meaningful developmental opportunities so staff is ready to move up when the time is right.

 

This program will discuss how we developed a program designed to groom staff to be competitive with the best candidates as they prepare to step into the next level of responsibility. 

 

Room B

PLM

Roadmap to a Successful New Building

Robert Hubsher, Librarian, Executive Director

Ramapo Catskill Library System

Middletown, New York 

 

Karen Watson, Architect

PLAN22

Newburgh, NY.

www.2plan22.com

 

The more you understand about your library, the better able you are to communicate your library’s vision. Understanding the facts about your library now will lead to better decision making when planning your  library's future.  It is important for the librarian to lead the examination of the library's existing processes and spaces before formulating ideas about what direction a new library, addition or renovation project should take.  The process of determining what you need begins with gathering data about all aspects of your library: the work, the spaces, the duties performed, how the duties are performed, your staff roles, and the people you serve. The data you collect becomes one of core element of your building program.  The library building program is the base for all the decisions that will be made throughout the building project; it is one of the tools that will help you get the library you need.  The building programming exercise is vital to the success of your project.  It results in an accessible, effective and comprehensive document that helps you communicate, with confidence to your design professional and architect, all of your library’s unique requirements. The workshop will provide participants with an overview of the importance of the role of librarian as the leader of the building project.  We emphasize the relationship between effective data collection and the exercise of creating a successful, useful and relevant building program.

 

 

Monday July 11, 2011

 

10:30 am to 11:45 am                         

Concurrent Workshops   

 

Room C

ASLM

Cultivating Donors through Special Events

Regina McBride, Ph. D., Dean of Library and Information Services

Kyle Moore, Director of Development of Library and Information Services

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Edwardsville, Illinois

                       

The purpose of the workshop is to familiarize the participants with the necessary steps to ensure successful special events planning.  An example of steps, range from goal setting, through assessing outcomes.  Specifically, the presenters will share their experiences, achieved at several university libraries and the Special Olympics in Illinois, and lead discussions on the related and interdependent roles of special events and strategic fundraising.  Examples will include sponsored symposiums, exhibits, community events and fundraising events. The workshop will also present and discuss the principles of strategic fundraising as it relates to libraries.  Included will be topics such as: determining target donors; setting fundraising goals; and assessing donor potential. The presentation will examine the relationships among special events, marketing and achieving fundraising goals. It will also include a PowerPoint presentation, participant discussions and handouts of sample special events and fundraising goals.

 

Room D

ASLM

Strategic Positioning in Tough Times

Michael Crumpton, Assistant Dean for Administrative Services

University Libraries at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Greensboro, North Carolina

 

Libraries all across the country are faced with increasingly difficult decisions with regard to reduction of funding sources while trying to maintain a high level of service to the parent institution.  Many look internally for opportunities to stretch or repurposing resources.  While reallocating materials and equipment purchases is one option, other options might focus on staffing and payroll expenses.  Re-purposing human resources is much different that other expense related decisions as it involves identification of work priorities and trends associated with institutional sustainability, assessment of work performed, individual skill sets and the need to convince people that change is a part of the scenario. This presentation will present a case study on how a middle sized academic library produced the data necessary to make re-purposing decisions with regard to staffing and work flow.  Specific steps were taken to identify emerging trends and prioritize the ones the library organization wanted to pursue, as well as analyze current staff work activities and skill sets.  This resulted in making changes to individual key responsibilities within the guidelines and context of the university’s overall human resources formula but provides better leverage to the organization in total. The goals of this program were to reposition library staff into activities and responsibilities that reflects a changing environment for both staff and constituents.  The other goal was to avoid layoffs or RIF’s by repurposing work activities of employees whose work responsibilities were affected by other changes brought about by budget cuts.  This presentation will demonstrate the process that was followed and discuss outcomes achieved so far.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday July 11, 2011

 

12:00 noon to 1:00 pm

 

Keynote Luncheon

Keynote Address: Kathy Schalk-Greene

Kathy Schalk-Greeneis the Director of Mount Laurel Library in New Jersey. Kathy was named New Jersey Library Association's "Librarian of the Year" for 2005 in part for leading her library team through the Trading Spaces: Reinventing the Library Environment Project (www.sjrlc.org/tradingspaces) which applied retail style display and customer service to a 33,000 square foot public library setting. Over five years, the library tripled circulation. She is past-president of the American Library Association Learning Round Table for Staff Development and Training and is considered by her peers to be a true visionary in library management.

Kathy speaks nationally on library merchandising and transformation and is a Public Library Association Certified Trainer and Planning Consultant.

 

1:00 pm to 2:15 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room A

PLM

Meeting Management

Michael Crumpton, Assistant Dean for Administrative Services

University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Greensboro, North Carolina

 

Pop culture often makes fun of meetings and how much of our lives can be dedicated to an endless loop of meetings.  This presentation will review the components that make up an effective meeting along with tips on how an effective meeting can bring productivity to other processes as well.  A meeting can set the stage for how well a process will evolve or how efficiently it gets executed.  A good meeting can also be valuable in generating a list of “To Do’s”, overall accomplishments or stakeholder investment in the project or topic. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday July 11, 2011

 

1:00 pm to 2:15 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room B

PLM

Understanding and Serving Job Hunting Millennials

Ellen Mehling, Outreach Librarian at the Job Information Center

Queens Library's Central Library

New York, NY

 

Millennials (those born between, roughly, 1978-1992) are sometime called “Echo Boomers” because their numbers are almost as large as the “Baby Boom” generation.  Because of their numbers they will have increasing power to change the American workplace but right now many are still in the early years of their careers. Their  preferences, experiences and expectations, for their careers and work life, are very different from previous generations, due to various factors including changes in technology, their assumption that they can and should customize their environment, constant communication & easy, mobile information retrieval, and the current sluggish economy. This presentation will discuss the characteristics and preferences of the Millennial generation, how they differ from previous generations in what they value and want, the challenges they are facing now, and advice for serving them as they seek employment and career success.

 

Room C

ASLM

Discovering the Marketing and Promotion of Discovery

Shawn Hartman Assistant Director of Public Services

Chadron State College

Chadron, Nebraska

 

As libraries begin their frantic race through the twenty-first century, it becomes apparent that successful marketing strategies are imperative if they want to survive. Libraries across the world are facing rising costs and decreasing budgets due to a largely world-wide economic retrenchment, to uneven technological advancements and adoptions, and to ever-increasing costs of acquiring materials and staffing the library adequately during a time of overall higher library usage. At the same time, the costs of higher education are rising. Consequently, with the constant rising costs and dwindling budgets, it is crucial that libraries (and librarians) effectively market their services. Along with this, it is also well known that academic dishonesty (commonly known as plagiarism) in schools and colleges throughout the world is not new. One need not search for evidence that it is ubiquitous in our society. In the research literature, academic dishonesty has been the subject of research for decades, addressing a wide variety of issues and questions, including what academic dishonesty is, how prevalent it is, who cheats, why students cheat, what the faculty reaction is, and what the institutional response is. The alarming rate of the incidence of plagiarism on campuses calls for more novel ways to address the problem. This workshop will explore the use and implementation of EbscoDiscovery System (EDS).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday July 11, 2011

 

1:00 pm to 2:15 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room D

PLM/ASLM

Prepare for the Worst and Hope for the Best: Disaster Preparedness for Libraries

Dr. Mott R. Linn, Jr., CA, Head of Collection Management

Clark University

Worcester, Massachusetts

 

Disasters happen.  A library building is supposed to protect the collection from damage, but they do not always do so.  How can you diminish the chance that a catastrophe will strike your collection?  If one does occur, what can you do to minimize the destruction?  Attend this workshop and learn both how to limit the chances that a disaster will strike your facility and how to reduce the amount of damage if one does occur.

                                               

2:15 pm to 2:30 pm 

Afternoon Break

 

2:30 pm to 3:45 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room A

PLM/ASLM

Giving Effective Feedback

Shea A. Taylor,Chief of Reference

CityCollege of New York

New York, New York

Managers and employees often dread the annual performance appraisal but it doesn’t have to be a negative experience. Learning effective feedback skills can help you reduce conflict and stress during the annual review, and by giving productive feedback throughout the year supervisors can improve staff relationships and motivate employees. This presentation will cover such areas as how to give and receive feedback, when and where feedback should be conducted, things to avoid, and practice scenarios.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday July 11, 2011

 

2:30 pm to 3:45 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room B

PLM

Hiring for Success – Are They on the Right Bus?

Mary E. Bennett-Brown, Human Resources Director

The Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

 

Cathy Wilkymacky,Library Services Manager for the West Region

The Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

 

In the Book “Good to Great!”, one of the leaders made a statement that when they began the research project, they expected to find that the first step in taking their company from good to great would be to set a new direction, a new vision and strategy for the company, and then to get people committed and aligned behind that new direction.  They found the opposite. This program will discuss how Managers make few decisions that will be as important as the selection of new employees.  Participants will understand our library’s approach to selecting staff and our principle of “when in doubt, don’t hire” and how impactful these decisions can be on the business strategy of the Library.

 

Room C

ASLM/PLM

From Zero to Sixty in Less Than One Year

Rachel Jorgensen, Assistant Professor

Michael Fitzgerald, Assistant Professor

University of the District of Columbia

Washington, D.C.

 

Short on money?  Short on IT staff? Think your library cannot move forward?  Wrong! With the right vision and planning, even small libraries – academic or public – can improve their public services and how they are perceived and valued by their patrons. This presentation will show how a few free or fairly inexpensive tools can dramatically change the operations of a library, helping both patrons and library staff.  But it takes more than just the tools.  What is needed is a clear vision for where the library wants to go and the proper planning to accomplish the steps along the way.  Choosing the right tools and understanding how they can work together and how each one contributes to achieving your goals is essential for success. 

 

Room D

ASLM

Last Off the Ship: Library Leadership in an Age of Calm and Chaos

Albert Municino, Librarian/Educational Media Specialist (Media Services Manager)

Library/Learning Resources Center

HudsonCounty Community College

Jersey City, New Jersey

 

A discussion on facilitative leadership, via Schwarz (and others), where four key components are defined:

Valid information, free and informed choice, internal commitment, and compassion. How can you develop those to make an impact by bringing out the best in people, in your career, and in daily work-flows? Need new insights into your situation? Need to manage and uncover innovation? This session is an inquiry on using facilitative and affiliative leadership styles for library leaders, managers, and librarians of all levels/libraries. Join us for some thought provoking reflections on how to lead yourself steadily through uncharted waters, listening/eliciting the best from people, without feeling like the last one off the ship.

Monday July 11, 2011

 

Concurrent Workshops

4:00 pm to 5:15 pm 

 

Room A

PLM

Understanding Transition

Mary E. Bennett-Brown, Human Resources Director

The Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

 

Cathy Wilkymacky,Library Services Manager for the West Region

The Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

 

Public libraries need to keep pace with ever-changing customer and taxpayer expectations.  In order to do this, library leaders must lead staff through the necessary changes that come with improvement.  The internal transition staff goes through before change can work is not automatic and it takes a leader with an understanding of this transition process to effectively coach staff through change. This program will focus on how the dynamics of organizational change and the accompanying personal transition affects the outcome of any change effort.   Participants in this session will become familiar with the stages of transition and strategies for helping staff navigate through change.

 

Room B

PLM

Participatory Management: Everybody into the Pool!

Deborah J. Paulson,Director

Columbia County Public Library

Lake City, Florida

 

This presentation will focus on the modern concepts of participatory management that have proven to be successful in a rural public library system in North Florida over the past five years. Despite decreasing finances and personnel, it is possible to provide excellent library service, creative programs and have employees who are motivated. Topics to be presented will include developing the library team, using communication, staff empowerment, and working with a decreased budget.

 

Room C

ASLM

Performance Management

Colleen S. Harris, Head of Access Services and Assistant Professor

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Chattanooga, Tennessee

Participants will discuss and engage with all aspects of effective performance management, including issues surrounding (and strategies for managing) a multigenerational workforce, motivating staff, skill deficiencies, staff development, and disciplinary action. The workshop includes case study discussions, reflective practice exercises, and useful scripts for handling what often feels like the hardest part of being a library manager: staff performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday July 11, 2011

 

Concurrent Workshops

4:00 pm to 5:15 pm 

 

Room D

ASLM

Monsters, Music, and Mysteries: Creating a Culture of Programming in the Academic Library

Cynthia Dudenhoffer, Director of Information Services

Smiley Memorial Library at Central Methodist University

Fayette, Missouri

 

As the missions of academic libraries change and technology and collections change, many students do not feel that the library holds as vital a place in the academic community as it once did.  Offering cultural programming revitalizes the library as “place” and create a more positive and accessible atmosphere for student engagement.  Library programming provides opportunities to meet with students personally on another level and make them feel comfortable in the library and with the librarians; making them more likely to seek out a librarian when doing research or working on a project.  Likewise, it places the library at the forefront of campus culture, providing not only a storehouse for knowledge, and a gateway to activities as well as information. In this workshop, attendees will learn how to integrate cultural programming into the everyday management of an academic library.  Based on the successful integration of cultural and outreach programming at Central Methodist University, the workshop would follow steps from surveying your campus population, focus groups to gauge interest, planning events that fit in campus culture, marketing these events, budgeting for them, and assessing their impact on the library overall.  We will also discuss incorporating information literacy activities and learning objectives into programming and events and how address programming with campus administration.   Practical examples and ideas will be provided. 

 

5:30-6:30 pm        Dinner is served

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7:00 pm to 8:30 pm    

 Steve Bernstein’s

“Keeping the Music Alive” Concert

celebrating the music of the 60’s and 70’s

 

Join singer/songwriter Steve Bernstein as he salutes the incredible artists of the 60’s and 70’s in a special 90 minute concert. Hear the music of Peter Paul & Mary, James Taylor, Simon and Garfunkel, the Cyrcle, Herman’s Hermits, Chicago, Neil Diamond, the Beatles, Blood Sweat and Tears, America, The Association, The Beach Boys, Bee-Gees, Bread, The Buckinghams, Buffalo Springfield Jimmy Buffett, The Byrds, Chad & Jeremy, Harry Chapin,  The Classics IV,  Creedence Clearwater Revival, The Critters, Crosby Stills & Nash, Dave Clark Five, John Denver, Dion, The Drifters, Bob Dylan, Edison Lighthouse, Everly Brothers, Gerry &  the Pacemakers,  Grateful Dead, The Guess Who, Tommy James and the Shondells, Jan and Dean, Jay & the Americans, Jefferson Airplane, Carole King, The Kinks, Gary Lewis & the Playboys, Gordon Lightfoot, and many more of your favorites.

 

 

                  

 

 

 

Tuesday July 11, 2011

 

8:30 am to 9:30 am

Registration & continental breakfast

 

9:30 am to 10:15 am

Keynote Address: Michael Germano

 

Michael Germano is a former attorney and people manager with more than a decade's experience managing high performing teams. As the library faculty member at California State University, Los Angeles dedicated to the College of Business and Economics, Michael is primarily focused upon teaching courses in financial information literacy as well as business information for decision-making. He holds a law degree from Temple University and a Master’s in Information Science from Simmons College. His other academic degrees include undergraduate and master’s degrees in English literature from St. Joseph’s University and New York University respectively. Prior to his appointment at California State University he held a variety of sales and marketing leadership positions for LexisNexis. Michael is a contributor to several professional journals including Library Management Today.

 

10:15 am to 10:30 am 

Morning Break

 

10:30 am to 11:45 am   

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room A

PLM/ASLM

Leading in Difficult Times

Regina Golia, Ed. D., Consultant, Facilitator, and Coach

Training and Development

New York, New York

 

Providing effective leadership is always a challenge, especially in bad economic times, and we can always improve our skills.  In today's economy, budgets and staff are reduced, demands are higher, and everyone is under stress.  This session will provide strategies to help you lead and cope with these additional stresses.  You will learn ways to encourage the participation and engagement of staff and to increase communication and morale.  The session will include opportunities to identify and share challenges and ideas, and to discuss solutions specific to your own situation.

 

Tuesday July 12, 2011

 

10:30 am to 11:45 am   

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room B

PLM

Catching, Caring and Connecting: How to Ensure You Make It Happen for Professionals in Your Public Library

Maureen Barry,Chief Executive Officer

Burlington Public Library

Ontario, Canada

 

Anne Murphy, Area Manager

Mississauga Library System

Ontario, Canada

 

Margie Singleton, Chief Executive Officer

Vaughan Public Libraries

Ontario, Canada

 

Changing demographics within the workplace have made many library administrators appreciate the mutual benefits of ensuring professional staff development needs are proactively managed. Maureen, Anne and Margie have devoted significant energy towards attracting, developing, and retaining professionals within their respective organizations. This session focuses on successfully positioning your library as “the” place to work. It includes innovative ways to develop and care for professional staff, resulting in retaining high performers and ensuring they are prepared for advancement within your organization. Mentoring, training and development, succession planning, and recognition are some of the topics to be explored.

 

Room C

ASLM

Managing the Future by Building Library Connections Through Programming

Karen Neurohr, Assistant Professor/Assessment Librarian

OklahomaState University

Stillwater, Oklahoma

This workshop will cover many aspects of library programming and outreach to help library managers understand how library programming can help fulfill mission and goals, increase partnerships, and provide positive evidence for stakeholders. Attendees will develop skills for successful programming and gain a deeper understanding of library programming implications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday July 12, 2011

 

10:30 am to 11:45 am   

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room D

ASLM

Why RDA?  Its Controversies and Significance and is Your Library Prepared for It?

Sharon Yang, Associate Professor/Systems Librarian

Marilyn Quinn, Associate Professor/Fine & Performing Arts Librarian

Rider University Libraries

Lawrenceville, New Jersey

 

RDA stands for Resource Description and Access, a new standard for describing library resources for the digital environment of the Semantic Web and future library systems. RDA aims to replace the cataloging rules used for the last half century and has completed a testing phase at the Library of Congress and other libraries. RDA has encountered both resistance and enthusiastic support in the library community. This presentation will explain RDA and the Semantic Web in simple terms, including origin, development, controversies, and promises. The targeted audience is library managers who may have no experience in cataloging, but should understand the impact of RDA on their libraries. The purpose of the presentation is to ensure that library managers have a basic understanding of the Semantic Web and RDA.

 

 

12:00 noon to 1:00 pm   

Lunch is served

 

1:00 pm to 2:15 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room A

PLM/ASLM

Resolution 101

Ian Reynolds, HR Distributed Campus Manager

George Mason University

Fairfax, Virginia

 

This workshop is designed to establish an individual’s ability to apply basic resolution approaches to handle difficult situations. It focuses on the basic foundations of conflict resolution and offers many valuable strategies to help the library manager better know himself/herself and to better manage conflict within the library organization.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday July 12, 2011

 

1:00 pm to 2:15 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room B

PLM/ASLM

Everyday Leadership: How to Increase Your Influence

Paul Glassman, Director of Library Services

Felician College, the Franciscan College of New Jersey

Lodi, New Jersey

 

Which leadership principles can librarians apply in order to increase influence, enhance resources, and cultivate political support?  Learn how to optimize the performance of your area, as well as your own professional contribution.  We will explore critical leadership skills, including collaboration, emotional intelligence, and managing changes. Topics will include the leadership skills necessary for all library professionals and associates, no matter what their job titles; how leadership differs from management; the effect of  influence and risk; how is vision and character fostered; and some of the practical ways to improve leadership score.

 

Room C

ASLM

I May Be a Boomer But I’m Still Taking Risks…

Charlet Key, Library Director

BlackHawk College

Moline, Illinois

 

The more things change, the more they stay the same – I wore a pair of white platform pumps at my wedding and an embroidered peasant tunic pant set as we left the reception.  Those shoes and tunic sets are now back in fashionJ  The printed indexes and the periodicals themselves have been supplanted by federated search engines that can retrieve full-text articles from a vast array of publications but we still spend considerable time justifying their expense to administration and explaining how to use them to our students.  This presentation will focus on managing/embracing change.

 

Room D

ASLM

Succession Planning: Growing Your Future Through Performance Appraisal

Vicki D. Bloom,Dean of the Library and Media Services

Indiana University

South Bend, Indiana

 

Denise M. Shorey, Associate Director for User Services

University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame, Indiana

 

This workshop focuses on the value of growing future leaders from within the organization. Libraries engaged in strategic thinking and planning leverage the strengths of their current employees by supporting leadership opportunities, often through seminars and workshops. An important tool that many overlook, however, is the performance appraisal. More than a method of assigning merit increases or providing much-needed feedback on performance, the performance appraisal is an opportunity to explicitly coach future library leaders. Whether it is goal-setting, prioritizing professional development and contributions, or highlighting particular skills, the savvy manager can use the annual review process to target an employee for specific leadership roles within the library.

 

Tuesday July 12, 2011

 

2:15 pm to 2:30 pm 

Afternoon Break

 

2:30 pm to 3:45 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room A

PLM/ASLM

Using Independent Contractors in Your Library

Robert H. Kieserman, Executive Director

Library Management Institute

Cherry Hill, New Jersey

           

Independent contractors working in the library must be treated very differently than employees. This workshop will examine the legal guidelines that libraries must follow when using entertainers, outside maintenance companies, consultants, and other independent contractors. The workshop will provide a clear understanding of the rules of the Internal Revenue Service as they directly affect the library and ultimately, the library manager.

 

Room B

PLM/ASLM

Employment Law for Library Managers

Michael Germano, Business Librarian

CaliforniaState University

Los Angeles, California

From the crafting of recruitments posts and job descriptions to interviewing, hiring, performance reviews, disciplinary actions, promotions and terminations, library managers face an array of decision and actions that can have significant legal implications. Oftentimes managers are unsure of their obligations as well as their duties to their institutions, themselves and their employees. The objective of this session is not simply to outline or summarize the law on this topic. Instead, the aim is to promote the development of a “legal information literate” decision-making process for library managers when faced with everything from interviewing to termination and the policy documents, such as employee handbooks, that guide these actions. The goal is to empower library managers to do what we do naturally in order to more effectively navigate the intricacies of employment law. Specifically, to spot relevant issues and use information resources effectively in order to foster decisions, actions and policies that prevent manager or employer liability related to discrimination, wage and hour violations, harassment, disability non-compliance, and wrongful termination. As a former attorney and seasoned people manager with more than a decade’s worth of experience leading high performing teams, Michael will share his human resources and legal knowledge in order to help attendees develop a self-help, information driven method for ensuring more effective management through awareness and compliance with key employment laws and their impact on library managers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday July 12, 2011

 

2:30 pm to 3:45 pm

Concurrent Workshops

 

Room C

ASLM

Academic Libraries and Copyright Law in Digital Age

Robert Congleton, Chair, Associate Professor-Librarian and Archivist

Rider University

Lawrenceville, New Jersey

 

Sharon Yang, Associate Professor and Systems Librarian

Rider University

Lawrenceville, New Jersey

 

As more and more library resources become available in electronic format, libraries need to know much more about digital copyright law and how it applies to academic library activities.  In this presentation we will discuss the concept of fair use, reproduction or display of a work, and preservation issues, and how the rights or limits libraries have under copyright law in the United States.  Examples of policies and procedures worked out at RiderUniversity and other higher education institutions will be used to illustrate the various ways copyright has been addressed in academic libraries. Library managers will get some basic knowledge about copyright law in digital age.

 

Room D

ASLM

Managing Change: Maintaining Your Footing as a Manager

Colleen S. Harris, Head of Access Services and Assistant Professor

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Chattanooga, Tennessee

Explore the always changing library work environment and the management skills necessary to succeed in it, including preparing and guiding staff, the organization as a whole, and our users. Also addresses how to deal with competing priorities and demands on staff and management time in the context of service and software migrations, software updates, rapidly changing hardware and perpetual technology skill development. Includes strategies for coping and encouragement in turbulent times.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LMI

REGISTRATION FORM

 

 

NAME _____________________________________________________________

 

LIBRARY __________________________________________________________

 

MAILING ADDRESS _____________________________________________________________

 

                                     ______________________________________________________________

 

PHONE __________________________________

 

EMAIL ADDRESS ________________________________________

 

Cost:  Early Registration: $159.00 per person     Regular Registration: $189.00 per person

 

Registration includes admission to both morning keynote sessions, all workshops, the keynote luncheon (Monday), dinner on Monday evening, and lunch on Tuesday. An optional evening activity in Philadelphia on Monday is available for a nominal fee.

 

Registration Process: To be eligible for the Early Registration Discount, we must receive your registration form with payment by June 15, 2011. We cannot accept registration forms after July 1, 2011.

                                            Early Registration                          Regular Registration

                                          must be received by                        must be received by

                                     June 15, 2011                                  July 1, 2011

  • Please contact us by email if you require special meal arrangements.

 

CANCELLATION POLICY: You may cancel your registration up until 5pm EDT on Wednesday July 6, 2011. If we receive your written notice of cancellation by that time and date, your registration fee will be fully refunded. If you cancel after that date, we reserve the right to retain a $75.00 cancellation fee.

 

TOTAL ENCLOSED:  $ _________

 

Please make checks payable to: Library Management Institute

 

Mail registration form and your check to:            Robert Kieserman

                                                                   P.O. Box 8562

                                                                   Cherry Hill, New Jersey 08034